Harbour scenes capture attention at artists’ exhibition

Written by  Thursday, 28 July 2016 11:53
Nichola Peasnell, chair of the Barnet Guild of Artists (left), shows the Chipping Barnet MP Theresa Villiers an oil painting, Staithes Sunrise, chosen as the poster illustration for the Guild’s 68th annual exhibition Nichola Peasnell, chair of the Barnet Guild of Artists (left), shows the Chipping Barnet MP Theresa Villiers an oil painting, Staithes Sunrise, chosen as the poster illustration for the Guild’s 68th annual exhibition
Well over 300 members, friends and supporters attended the preview of the Barnet Guild of Artists’ 68th annual exhibition which continues at Christ Church, St Albans Road, until Saturday 6 August.

Pennefather Hall was packed to hear the chair Nichola Peasnell open the show and thank members for having produced another magnificent display of paintings, pottery, sculpture, glass and textiles.

Guests included the Chipping Barnet MP Theresa Villiers who was among the admirers of Staithes Sunrise, an oil painting by Chris Baker, that had been chosen for the poster promoting this year’s exhibition.

Staithes harbour, in North Yorkshire, has long been a favourite with artists, having been the home of the group known as the Northern Impressionists, and is all the more popular because its most famous resident was Captain Cook.

Another harbour scene that captured attention was a watercolour of Mevagissey, Cornwall, by Barbara Gladding, a guild member for the last 12 years, who started painting at the age of 13.

Barbara Gladding (centre), a long-standing member of the Barnet Guild of Artists, with her watercolour of Mevagissey, one of her five painting on display at the Guild’s 68th annual exhibition. With her are friends, Elaine Padmore and Grant ShelleyBarbara Gladding (centre), a long-standing member of the Barnet Guild of Artists, with her watercolour of Mevagissey, one of her five painting on display at the Guild’s 68th annual exhibition. With her are friends, Elaine Padmore and Grant ShelleyAfter failing the 11-plus exam, Ms Gladding enrolled at the former Willesden Technical College of Art where she studied technical art until she was 18.

“In those days Willesden Technical College offered a wonderful education. The girls mostly did technical art and drawing, and boys enrolled for either the building or engineering colleges.

We had a great time together.”

Her painting of Mevagissey harbour was based on a photograph and took 40 hours to complete.

“I even stayed up all night, from 1pm in the afternoon until 7am next morning in order to finish the painting in time for the exhibition.”

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